The Normative Ethics of Ghosting

One of the concerning phenomenon of the Zoomer generation is the ubiquity with which they ghost. If this were just a means of ending romantic or sexual relationships, that would be one thing. Yet, platonic and professional relationships are equally or almost equally the subject of it. Ghosting is, when not avoiding a truly dangerousContinue reading “The Normative Ethics of Ghosting”

Villian Without a Reason: Outgroup Bias and Autistic Life

Earlier on this blog, I’ve written about how being autistic can lead to misunderstandings and how others can form inaccurate moral judgments based on those. I more than welcome any new reader to browse my website and also share any content they find worthy of it. Yet, for this article, I will expound upon theContinue reading “Villian Without a Reason: Outgroup Bias and Autistic Life”

In His Mother’s Basement: Failure and Moral Judgment

In my studies of moral judgment, what and who people think are moral seldom comport with what is actually moral. The title of this piece refers to the common trope that losers get what they deserve as if there is some great moral justice that is awarded to people on Earth. If someone is downContinue reading “In His Mother’s Basement: Failure and Moral Judgment”

Social Media & Moral Judgment

Before on this blog, I have detailed ideas about moral thinking and I’ve written about social media but how does one affect the other. In many ways, of course. The worst thing about social media is that it amplifies everything wrong with the regular media. The stories for which “If it bleeds, it leads” appliesContinue reading “Social Media & Moral Judgment”

The Politics of Restraining Order

A lot has been said about how authorities coddle Gen Z and Millennials and how this generation has not learned how to tolerate the mildest forms of being offended and being made uncomfortable. I would agree, in part, but the issue is not so much that the adults taught them that they were special andContinue reading “The Politics of Restraining Order”

Is Being Popular Immoral?

                Of course, not, per se. That is not the question I actually seek to answer. A lot of the work I do in disability advocacy, more than the other politics I do, involves fighting the sociology of cliques and even this far into my adulthood, the world is still very high school-esque. The questionContinue reading “Is Being Popular Immoral?”

Ugliness & Moral Perception

                Long in the history of our culture have our monsters been ugly and the heroes who slay them been handsome. While it is a cliched point of ethics that one’s character is mostly separate from one’s exterior, the great question remains to what extent does the average cognitive bias judge, not social acceptability, butContinue reading “Ugliness & Moral Perception”

Metaphorical Cocaine: The Social Effects of Dopamine’s Zombies

Almost everyone who went to my high school hated it and I have written repeatedly as to my own experiences and why I came to hate it. I have analyzed the cognitive biases and insularity of cliques and ingroup/outgroup biases. Yet, possibly, on the most fundamental level the reason why people were so cruel andContinue reading “Metaphorical Cocaine: The Social Effects of Dopamine’s Zombies”

The Death of Eccentricity

Recently, I was reading Jonathan Haidt’s dissertation from 1992 entitled “Should you eat your dog?” A paper that covers an issue very important to many people on the spectrum. It focuses on the morality of harmless offenses that are considered offensive. Now, I will avoid using the term harmless in favor of the word eccentricContinue reading “The Death of Eccentricity”

The Subjectivity of Kindness: Hermeneutics of what Should be Objective

Kindness. While most would agree with the concept, as an ethicist, a psychologist, and a social scientist, the word’s ambiguity is problematic. In practice, anything that can be lawyered to be ultimately, even indirectly, altruistic is argued to be “kind”. When pressed, people will exploit the word’s vagueness to paint themselves in a much betterContinue reading “The Subjectivity of Kindness: Hermeneutics of what Should be Objective”