Mental Health & Liberalism

In Francis Fukuyama’s 1989 essay “The End of History”, he expounded that history ended in 1806 with the defeat of the Holy Roman Empire by Napoleon at the Battle of Jena. His reasoning was that this was the moment Enlightenment ideas in politics had crossed the point of no return and would remain the foundationContinue reading “Mental Health & Liberalism”

Trauma and Autism

For therapy to be effective it is usually required that the cuases of one’s trauma be sympathetic. If they refect upon one’s reputation unsympathetically then it is sometimes almost impossible to get effective treatment. Many of the earliest articles on this blog concerned themselves with the overreaction to minor social mistakes. A serious reason forContinue reading “Trauma and Autism”

Autism & Empathy

One commonly cited symptom of autism is our apparent lack of empathy. It conveys the idea that we’re hard, STEM-oriented, robots without the capacity for human connection. The fact is, while there are large portions of the autistic population who don’t compensate for their low oxytocin and other sympathetic neurochemical levels with other means ofContinue reading “Autism & Empathy”

The Normative Ethics of Ghosting

One of the concerning phenomenon of the Zoomer generation is the ubiquity with which they ghost. If this were just a means of ending romantic or sexual relationships, that would be one thing. Yet, platonic and professional relationships are equally or almost equally the subject of it. Ghosting is, when not avoiding a truly dangerousContinue reading “The Normative Ethics of Ghosting”

Villian Without a Reason: Outgroup Bias and Autistic Life

Earlier on this blog, I’ve written about how being autistic can lead to misunderstandings and how others can form inaccurate moral judgments based on those. I more than welcome any new reader to browse my website and also share any content they find worthy of it. Yet, for this article, I will expound upon theContinue reading “Villian Without a Reason: Outgroup Bias and Autistic Life”

In His Mother’s Basement: Failure and Moral Judgment

In my studies of moral judgment, what and who people think are moral seldom comport with what is actually moral. The title of this piece refers to the common trope that losers get what they deserve as if there is some great moral justice that is awarded to people on Earth. If someone is downContinue reading “In His Mother’s Basement: Failure and Moral Judgment”

Social Media & Moral Judgment

Before on this blog, I have detailed ideas about moral thinking and I’ve written about social media but how does one affect the other. In many ways, of course. The worst thing about social media is that it amplifies everything wrong with the regular media. The stories for which “If it bleeds, it leads” appliesContinue reading “Social Media & Moral Judgment”

The Politics of Restraining Order

A lot has been said about how authorities coddle Gen Z and Millennials and how this generation has not learned how to tolerate the mildest forms of being offended and being made uncomfortable. I would agree, in part, but the issue is not so much that the adults taught them that they were special andContinue reading “The Politics of Restraining Order”

Is Being Popular Immoral?

                Of course, not, per se. That is not the question I actually seek to answer. A lot of the work I do in disability advocacy, more than the other politics I do, involves fighting the sociology of cliques and even this far into my adulthood, the world is still very high school-esque. The questionContinue reading “Is Being Popular Immoral?”

Ugliness & Moral Perception

                Long in the history of our culture have our monsters been ugly and the heroes who slay them been handsome. While it is a cliched point of ethics that one’s character is mostly separate from one’s exterior, the great question remains to what extent does the average cognitive bias judge, not social acceptability, butContinue reading “Ugliness & Moral Perception”